Worth it? Vaseline Spray Moisturizer

Vaseline Spray Moisturizer

Spray-on lotions have been a, “thing,” for a little while now – at least a year or two I believe. And why not? We have spray-on sunscreen. Even though I primarily use spray-on sunscreen for my body, I never considered spray lotions until recently.

The Motivation

Primarily? Laziness, go figure.

That aside, I recently repurchased some Eucerin, but accidentally purchased the wrong one due to a packaging change. The one I bought by mistake is effective but leaves a weird greasy feeling; that just doesn’t work when you need to get dressed sooner rather than later. That said, even my main squeeze didn’t always dry as fast as I’d like – in winter I’m not terribly keen on being chilly while lotion dries.

The $6 can of Vaseline Spray Moisturizer was a low-risk gamble in the first place, but throw in a coupon from the paper and it was an easy choice.

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Biotin and Blemishes

biotin gummies

First things first: Remember, I’m not a doctor or a medical professional. I’m not qualified to dispense medical advice. My experiences are not gospel, and you should always do your homework and consult a doctor about supplements and whatnot.

Last Summer

I started taking these yummy Biotin gummy supplements to help get some excessive shedding in check before I took the plunge on haircolor. I mentioned those gummies in my August 2016 Favorites post.

After three weeks of use, I started to see desirable results. My shedding slowed back to a normal rate. and over the next month my hair seemed to be in overall better shape. Beyond the hair on my head, my eyebrows have actually fleshed out pretty well – that wasn’t my original goal with the supplement, but a welcomed effect nonetheless, as it means I can spend less time and product on my brows.

It has been nearly eight months, and my hair is happy!

Biotin and Your Skin

My skin, however, is not. In that favorites post, I mentioned that I had read that acne-prone individuals experienced an increase in breakouts. I wouldn’t describe myself as acne-prone, but I didn’t get away scot-free. Just as I thought my skin had stabilized, I started to experience blemishes unlike my usual ones about eight weeks in.

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January 2017 Favorites

January 2017 FavoritesJanuary 2017 Favorites
CeraVe Foaming Cleanser, $9 / Sally Hansen Apricot Cuticle Cream, $5 /
Sure Aerosol Antiperspirant, $3 / Tree Hut Sugar Scrub, $7 / Vaseline Spray Moisturizer, $6

Yeah – I completely screwed up and forgot to write about my January 2017 Favorites. Oops. It’s a drugstore kind of month, in fact. Details after the jump.

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Cleanser Update – February 2017 – CeraVe Foaming

I’ve talked about my unexpected transition from reasonably problem-free to annoying skin. Turns out, what I’ve experienced isn’t uncommon; skin changes are fairly routine in one’s mid-twenties. Curious? Do a google search for adult onset acne and you’ll be given a wealth of results.

It’s frustrating, but I feel for the first time in a while that I’ve got the upper hand on it. It’s fairly controlled. I still get an uncomfortable cystic blemish (hard to deal with!) or errant, hard plug in a pore (easy to deal with) from time-to-time, but my skin isn’t having a panic attack.

 

CeraVe Foaming Facial CleanserCeraVe Foaming Cleanser ($9)

Since I last shared my Arsenal in June 2016, I’ve made one major change – switching my cleanser to one with better-suited pH.

Micellar water is still my main squeeze for makeup removal and light cleansing (like in the morning after a good cleanse the night before). I interchangeably use Garnier’s Skinactive Micellar Cleansing Water and Simple’s Micellar Cleansing Water with no discernible difference in my skin.

I’ve switched back to CeraVe Foaming Cleanser ($9), which is priced similarly to Cetaphil. I tried it briefly a couple years ago and ultimately dismissed it. This time around, I’m surprised to find that I’m liking it. Although it has the same pH as Philosophy’s Purity ($24, 80z) cleanser, my skin seems to prefer it. Considering the price difference between the two, I’ll take it!

pH Matters

Cetaphil may well be gentle, but its pH is slightly higher than the pH of skin (between 4.5 and 6.2). At 6.5-6.7, which of course changes with the pH of your water, it is already close to neutral. In the long run, skin responds better to an acidic cleanser; it helps preserve the integrity of the skin’s acid mantle. Maintaining your acid mantle is important; in short, it’s your body’s first defense against bacteria and other contaminants that could be introduced to your body via your skin.

Inadvertently, I may have been compromising my acid mantle by using a nearly-neutral cleanser. My water tends to run somewhat alkaline, and since I rent, I can’t install any systems to correct for that. Since I’ve made the change to CeraVe Foaming Facial Cleanser in early December, my skin has stabilized.

I may eventually find that something more acidic than 5.5 is better for my needs, but I’m satisfied with my new normal for now.

2016 Favorites

I’m sticking to last year’s annual favorites format because it worked well.

2016 Favorites - Garnier & Simple Micellar Water

Garnier Micellar Water, $7; Simple Micellar Water, $8

If I had to pick a single type of product to name as a favorite in 2016, I’d have to say micellar water is it. I like both of these and purchase whichever is a better value at the time. I’ve totally given up makeup wipes in favor of using this with cotton pads or a reusable makeup removing cloth.

Pantene Pro-V Stylers Mousse, $6

This mousse is my, “daily driver.” Out of the (average) 135 days per year I blow-dry my hair, this product is in my hair at least 95 of them. (The remaining ~40 is either hyper-lazy, product-free, or calls for the big guns.) It is accessible, inexpensive, and reliable – and it works well on my hair.

Gimme Brow

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