Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes

I’m still slowly working my way through a bottle of Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Gel. I use less of it these days since I’m having good luck with my Mountain Rose Herbs argan oil, but it’s still a good lightweight moisturizer for those with combination to oily skin. At this point, I don’t think I would repurchase unless I bought it from the CCO at less-than-retail or managed to catch it on a rare sale like Macy’s recent VIP sale.

Generic Price, Perhaps Prestige Quality?

In my internet wanderings, though, I’ve come across TWO Clinique Dramatically Different dupes or generics. Until now, I’ve never seen Clinique Dramatically Different dupes, or any other Clinique dupes for that matter. They are both generics of the lotion version of Dramatically Different.

One, from Sally Beauty’s GVP (Generic Value Products) line:

Clinique Dramatically Different DupesGVP Distinctively Unique Moisturizing Lotion

With a Sally’s card, it’s $9.69 and they frequently offer B1G1 50% off on the GVP line. It only has one review, which is glowing, but still. For less than half the cost of the, “real deal,” I’d probably venture the money and give it a shot if I were in the market.

Two, from Wal-Mart’s Equate line:

Equate Strikingly Unique Moisturizing Lotion

The price on this one varies – on Walmart.com it is marked around $12, but through Wal-Mart Grocery (their pickup service, more on that below), it is marked down to $6.84. Apparently, Wal-Mart’s Equate line has a whole host of generic versions of Clinique products. Realistically, I’d be skeptical – but there are 55 reviews, many from former Dramatically Different users, giving it nearly five stars.

Side Note on Wal-Mart Grocery: I’ve used this service for nearly two months (yes, with my own money) I wholeheartedly recommend it to my friends, family, colleagues, and fellow busy people. They don’t charge for pickup orders, and I save time and the hassle of going in a store (particularly Wal-Mart – I love this service, but I don’t love being IN Wal-Mart. Sorry not sorry).

If that sounds relevant to your interests, you can sign up and save $10 on your first order here. I do get a small referral kickback but do not have an affiliate relationship with Wal-Mart; any Wal-Mart Grocery customer can refer their friends or family in the same way.

I’ve tried neither of the Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes in this post, but was intrigued by seeing generic versions of prestige products.

Is It Risky?

Compared to trying to buy Clinique Amazon or some other random, non-licensed reseller? Not at all.

I’d be more comfortable buying a generic version of a product from an established generic line like Equate or GVP. Even if it ends up being not as high quality a product, it isn’t mislabeled or falsely packaged. Generic house brands or private labels like Equate and GVP are directly tied to the reputation of the retailer that sells them – so even if we aren’t quiiite getting Clinique quality, they aren’t going to offer a comparison product that unsafe. From a business perspective, it doesn’t make sense.

I’m Curious

Would you try either of these Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes or other generic version of popular Prestige products?

Maybelline and Manny

Maybelline and Manny

A couple months ago, Maybelline, purveyors of my favorite (and therefore most-purchased and most-used) drugstore concealer, announced that MannyMUA as a new, “face,” of Maybelline.

What This Post is Not

This post is not commentary on the presence of men in the beauty community. It doesn’t bother me that some gentlemen enjoy cosmetics. That just means we have something in common. Manny Fans: If you’re reading, this isn’t a Roast of MannyMUA, but there is critical content. Keep the comments classy, thanks.

What This Post Is

The aim of this post is instead to comment on the judgment and business decision-making. The partnership between Maybelline and Manny was surprising to me. Although MannyMUA is a popular beauty YouTube personality, he has been embroiled in several incidents in the fairly-recent past.

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Z Palette Scandal

I own a Z Palette that I won in a contest a few years ago. Since then, I’ve made a few posts mentioning it, and some of their other products. No more. The recent Z Palette scandal resulting from their disgraceful PR-nightmare is too much for many former customers, myself included.  Z-Palettes will not be mentioned or featured on this blog henceforth.

I can empathize with the frustration that one would experience on the receiving end of criticism for a new product launch. After receiving some skeptical and critical responses on an Instagram post – not even on their OWN Instagram, mind you, but on TrendMood’s, ZPalette lashed out. The results were jaw-dropping.

The Unbelievable Z Palette Scandal

This is a screenshot of just SOME of the responses they sent to Instagram users on TrendMood’s post about their new Z Potter (overpriced induction) device. Instagram users had expressed a ton of thoughts ranging from excitement to uncertainty and skepticism to criticism. The job of a social media manager, however, is not to strike back with acidic replies:

Z Palette Scandal

These are fairly tame. The list of things they felt it appropriate to respond with included calling young ladies cheap dates, insulting people’s financials, or suggesting that they are somehow less evolved. Here’s some examples of the classy replies from the brilliant soul manning the Z Palette Social Media desk:

  • You look like a cheap date, but we’re not messing with you.😂”
  • “Listen to some Jim Rohn — it’s not that it’s expensive, it’s that you can’t afford it.”
  • “If that’s a stove to you, I wonder how big your kitchen is.”

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Unpopular Opinion: On Urban Decay Druggie at Sephora

Over the past week, I’ve seen entirely too many articles decrying Sephora for selling an eyeshadow named, “Druggie.” I anticipate my opinion on this matter to be fairly unpopular – and while I welcome dissent and discussion in the comments, let’s keep it civil.

Making Light of It

Those upset say that the shade name is insensitive; that it makes light of the losses so many have experienced related to addiction. There’s even a Change.org petition with over a thousand signatures begging Sephora to pull the shade. They even go so far as to suggest alternate names.

Urban Decay Druggie

 

Interestingly enough, these articles and people are largely targeting Sephora, like they made the damn shade name. Fun fact, people: Sephora doesn’t own Urban Decay or Urban Decay Druggie eyeshadow or the After Dark palette. Efforts would be better focused there, or at their parent company, L’Oreal.

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Instagram Makeup in the Workplace

In December 2015, I wrote about my feelings on, “needing,” to don warpaint for the office. That opinion hasn’t changed.

In the last two or so years, I’ve seen a dramatic rise in what I’ll call Instagram makeup being worn in public. Okay, cool.

…but Instagram Makeup in the workplace?

Wear makeup to work if you want to, don’t if you don’t. But for the love of cats, get a sense of what is appropriate for work.

Instagram Makeup ... at Work?Skilled? Yes. Work appropriate? No. (pic found on Pinterest)

Last week, in my non-creative office I saw two different women with full-fledged smoky, glittery cut-creases, not unlike what is depicted above. WhatThe problem isn’t unique to my office, though. Many offices, judging by what I see while out for lunch during the work week, have this disconnect. That’s not to mention other work environments where a full-blown, beat, drag-inspired glam face of makeup is not appropriate (read: most of them). Just like shorts-suits or miniskirts, where did the idea that this is appropriate for work come from?

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