Two Cents: Instagram Makeup for Everyday Wear

Instagram MakeupI was watching this video about using Tarte Shape tape from Stephanie Marie on YouTube and laughed at the, “if you’re NOT A YOUTUBER,” part of the title. (Btw: She’s spot-on with the recommendations on how to use Shape Tape, but more on that from me in another post).

Makeup needed to look, “good,” on camera or film is not the same as what one would wear in real life. Certainly there are occasional intersections, but think about it: such makeup is by necessity stronger, heavier, more dramatic.

Instagram Makeup & Influence

We’ve reached a point where Instagram makeup is so pervasive that people think that those looks are it. Everyone is going hard with concealer-driven under-eye highlights, two tablespoons of highlighting powder, matte liquid lips, and very serious eyebrows.

  • It’s one thing if a a full-face of Instagram or YouTube-ready makeup is what you like. There’s nothing wrong with that, and there’s definitely a ton of artistry to appreciate. I see incredible, mind-blowing makeup on Instagram and YouTube all.the.time.
  • …it’s another if you don’t care for heavily done makeup but feel compelled to wear it because that’s what’s trendy.

Multiple Routes

There’s more than one, “right,” way to wear makeup. In my opinion, artistry like Lisa Eldridge’s is woefully underrated. Alone, Lisa has taught me more than a dozen gurus with the same IKEA vanity setup (only a little shade because tbh I kind of want one too, Alex drawers and all) have combined. Recently, I read a comment on one of her videos that said something along the lines of:

I believe that in twenty years all those Kardashian-inspired looks trending on social media will be a butt of a joke as much as eighties New Romantic look is now.

Struck a chord with me, really. I enjoy a bit of everything for the most part, but have a realistic approach to, well, real life.

The Bottom Line

What do you think of Instagram makeup for everyday wear? Are you on-trend, or do you prefer more timeless looks?

Contigo Chill

Contigo Grace

Hydration is important. After about a year of using a Camelbak Eddy which was hard to clean, I switched to a Contigo Grace water bottle. I love that I can drink from it one handed; the Grace is designed such that you don’t have to fumble with unscrewing and re-securing a cap. It is lightweight yet sturdy and inexpensive to boot.

The Contigo Grace is great, but it isn’t insulated. Generally, I like my water cool (not cold – somewhere between room temperature and cold) but it is difficult to keep it that way if you’re carrying the bottle around by hand. It ends up warming up a bit more than I love when I’m running between meetings at work. Solution: Buy an insulated one.

Enter the Contigo Chill

Contigo Chill

The Chill features a similar one-handed, push-button dispensing design as the Grace, but it’s stainless steel and maintains temperature for about 12 hours. I’m really enjoying it so far.

So far, so good. I’m happy with it; I got the Scuba Blue one, but if my Target would have had the Matte Black/Berry one, I would have gotten it.

If you’re partial to one-handed use with sip-valves and straws, the Contigo Ashland Chill is your guy; my husband has the non-insulated version and it’s just as sturdy and excellent as the Grace. The straw

The Bottom Line

The opportunity to test the Contigo Chill in the heat of summer has not yet manifested because I’ve only had it for about two months. Do I think it will maintain cold or cool in 90+ degree heat for twelve hours? No, realistically – but even four hours would be awesome in those conditions. I convinced my husband to get a Contigo Chill in addition to his uninsulated bottle from them and we haven’t looked back.

Back on a No Buy / March Haul

no buy

I’ve accomplished and purchased the things I wanted to do and more without going overboard. My rules are a little different this time, though, based on what I reasonably expect to need to restock.

The Rules

No…

  • Makeup, brushes, storage, or tools
  • Hair products or tools
  • Nail products or tools
  • Fragrance purchases
  • Skincare
  • Beauty services (hair, nails, brows)

E-mail won’t be auto-deleted, but I won’t go browsing just for mindless amusement.

Exceptions to the No Buy

  • If MUJI drawers go on sale for $10 again, I’m going for it.
  • If I break a jaw clip (lazy hair days), I will replace it.
  • Obviously if I run out of my facial cleanser, I will repurchase. To me, this is more of a hygiene non-negotiable; plus, my cleanser is drugstore.

My March Haul

  • Replacement Gimme Brow.
  • Essence Make Me Brow – a <$5 alternative to Gimme Brow…for science.
  • Sally Beauty’s GVP version of Clairol Shimmer Lights Shampoo. I’m almost out of my Blond Brilliance purple conditioner, and I read shampoo is better-suited to this task.
  • Tarte’s Airbuki brush to use with my Amazonian Clay powder foundation (reviews on both coming soon) during Macy’s VIP Sale, man. Got it cheap!
  • Tarte Shape Tape Concealer.
  • Radiance brush heads for my Clarisonic…also 20% off at Ulta.

I’m Stocked Up On…

  • Concealer. I have concealer FOR. DAYS. Between my drugstore holy grail, MAC Pro Longwear, NARS Radiant Creamy, and now Tarte Shape Tape…yeah. I’m good. I probably need to extend a concealer No Buy past the duration of this one.
  • Missha Perfect Cover – when I realized I liked it, I bought a backup tube, so I have enough to last me quite a while. Even a shade that I can mix when I start self tanning/accidentally get natural color in spite of my sunscreen.
  • Mascara is good, too – I just opened a new L’Oreal Telescopic Carbon Black, and I have an unopened one.
  • Brow products.

Are you considering a no buy soon?

Gone Downhill: Influenster

For years, I’ve been a member of two social influencer review sites: BzzAgent and Influenster. I love BzzAgent – they send full size product to try or vouchers to acquire one, their review and activity asks are not absurd. They are consistent. Influenster, on the other hand is all over the place and requests a ridiculous amount of time to be invested in exchange for participation in their program.

A Weird Mix

I’ve gotten multiple Influenster VoxBoxes that contained a hodge-podge of product that was in no way related. I’ve received I’m flat-out NOT interested in trying or spending time reviewing, like snack items (gross protein bars, dried snap peas trying to be chips). Don’t get me wrong – I did so because those were the terms of the program. But was once an occasional annoyance is now fairly regular.

Unlike BzzAgent, who tells about the campaign so you can opt-in or out, Influenster tends to be a bit more cloak-and-dagger. You take a qualifier survey that may allude to the items or brands, but it is rarely explicit.

Social Graces Spamming

The point of a social marketing and social influencer program is to get real people to try things. Those people then share their experiences in multiple mediums:

  • In-person conversations
  • Reviews on:
    • The program site
    • The product’s site
    • Retailer’s sites
  • Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, etc)
  • Video (YouTube, Snapchat, Instagram stories)
  • Blogs

When they mandate specific mediums, though, they reduce participation. For example – I do not have a Snapchat. I will not open one, period – especially not to do a ridiculous campaign activity. I also do not make YouTube videos…and will not do that just for some ridiculous campaign activity.

“Too much,” will vary from person to person and circle to circle, but Influenster definitely wants you to spam the hell out of everyone via every possible Other Influenster participants I’ve talked to agree that it is getting out of hand and that they feel like Influenster wants them to spam their friends and family. not cool.

Read moreGone Downhill: Influenster

Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes

I’m still slowly working my way through a bottle of Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Gel. I use less of it these days since I’m having good luck with my Mountain Rose Herbs argan oil, but it’s still a good lightweight moisturizer for those with combination to oily skin. At this point, I don’t think I would repurchase unless I bought it from the CCO at less-than-retail or managed to catch it on a rare sale like Macy’s recent VIP sale.

Generic Price, Perhaps Prestige Quality?

In my internet wanderings, though, I’ve come across TWO Clinique Dramatically Different dupes or generics. Until now, I’ve never seen Clinique Dramatically Different dupes, or any other Clinique dupes for that matter. They are both generics of the lotion version of Dramatically Different.

One, from Sally Beauty’s GVP (Generic Value Products) line:

Clinique Dramatically Different DupesGVP Distinctively Unique Moisturizing Lotion

With a Sally’s card, it’s $9.69 and they frequently offer B1G1 50% off on the GVP line. It only has one review, which is glowing, but still. For less than half the cost of the, “real deal,” I’d probably venture the money and give it a shot if I were in the market.

Two, from Wal-Mart’s Equate line:

Equate Strikingly Unique Moisturizing Lotion

The price on this one varies – on Walmart.com it is marked around $12, but through Wal-Mart Grocery (their pickup service, more on that below), it is marked down to $6.84. Apparently, Wal-Mart’s Equate line has a whole host of generic versions of Clinique products. Realistically, I’d be skeptical – but there are 55 reviews, many from former Dramatically Different users, giving it nearly five stars.

Side Note on Wal-Mart Grocery: I’ve used this service for nearly two months (yes, with my own money) I wholeheartedly recommend it to my friends, family, colleagues, and fellow busy people. They don’t charge for pickup orders, and I save time and the hassle of going in a store (particularly Wal-Mart – I love this service, but I don’t love being IN Wal-Mart. Sorry not sorry).

If that sounds relevant to your interests, you can sign up and save $10 on your first order here. I do get a small referral kickback but do not have an affiliate relationship with Wal-Mart; any Wal-Mart Grocery customer can refer their friends or family in the same way.

I’ve tried neither of the Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes in this post, but was intrigued by seeing generic versions of prestige products.

Is It Risky?

Compared to trying to buy Clinique Amazon or some other random, non-licensed reseller? Not at all.

I’d be more comfortable buying a generic version of a product from an established generic line like Equate or GVP. Even if it ends up being not as high quality a product, it isn’t mislabeled or falsely packaged. Generic house brands or private labels like Equate and GVP are directly tied to the reputation of the retailer that sells them – so even if we aren’t quiiite getting Clinique quality, they aren’t going to offer a comparison product that unsafe. From a business perspective, it doesn’t make sense.

I’m Curious

Would you try either of these Clinique Dramatically Different Dupes or other generic version of popular Prestige products?